Cameron Clokie on the Miracle of Stem Cells

People who are not enlightened about the discipline of regeneration and stem cells may have the impression that the area of study is more horrific than it really is.

Anyone who was alive and conscious in the 2000s may vaguely remember stem cell research being associated with unborn human offspring that were aborted. There was some sort of controversy claiming that aborted offspring were being used to further the research, since aborted offspring are full of stem cells.

There were television shows made during that time period that talked about the issue, and any human being who watched these shows and didn’t know anything about stem cell research would have thought that the only way to harvest stem cells would be to harvest them from a stream of aborted human offspring. Learn more about Cameron Clokie: https://www.facebook.com/Dr-Cameron-Clokie-1711496149080699/

All of these allegations and things in the media only confused and miseducated a lot of people about stem cells. Stem cells are everywhere. There are even stem cells in the bodies of fully developed human beings.

The fact that stem cells are everywhere lays the foundation for current treatments of tissue regeneration treatments in adults. Researchers have perfected treatments that harness the power of the stem cells that are floating around people’s bodies.

According to Crunchbase, Cameron Clokie is active in the development of regenerative procedures. Many adults can thank him for the help that he has given them in regenerating the bone tissue in their faces.

To those who still think that stem cells and regenerative therapies have something to do with aborted fetuses, here is some news: aborted fetuses were not used to regrow the bone tissue in their faces—the stem cells that were used came from their own bodies. Cameron Clokie is a maxillofacial surgeon.

Dent Events reveals that Cameron Clokie spreads his knowledge and does research at the University of Toronto.

Waiakea Water: Bringing Innovation to the Bottled Water Industry

Bottled water has been around since the beginning of the 1800s and shows no signs of going away. It’s convenient, accessible and simply a popular part of our daily lives. In recent years, people have began to turn their backs on the product. With environmental and climate issues looming, people are more concerned with the corrosive bi products of certain manufacturing, including bottled water. This is the time to look toward more environmentally conscious brands, like Waiakea Water.

Founded by Ryan Emmons in 2012, Waiakea Water aims to provide it’s buyers with some of the most pure and healthy water in the world. He tells organicauthority.com, “I discovered my family had access to one of the most naturally healthy, pure, and sustainable water sources in the world.” But not only that, Waiakea aims to benefit the environment as much as possible and at the same time assist those with no access to water in several parts of the world.

Waiakea water is naturally filtered through volcanic rock on an island that rains for 360 days a year. The rock is permeable and rich in minerals, giving the water a smooth taste and even nutritious qualities. Emmons has also found a method with his team to produce the packaging for his water in an efficient way. He’s reduced harmful emissions by up to %90 according to oranicauthority.com.

To support the people in the world with little to no access to fresh water, Emmons has partnered with Pump Aid, an organization that builds traditional water pumps for villages around the world. Focusing mainly on South Africa, Waikiea has helped build over 3,200 of these pumps to villages in need. On average Waiakea provides 650 liters of clean water to villages for every bottle sold, according to specialtyfood.com.

It’s time to feel good about what we buy and Waiakea let’s us do just that. Knowing our money is going not only to hydrating ourselves with amazing water, but others in need as well while harming the environment much less than traditional bottling methods sounds like a great deal. Who knew making a difference would be so refreshing?